MD-390 DMR UHF radio. Modified firmware.

I updated my MD-390 with the modified firmware. This fw. gives among others, these new functions:

  • Promiscuous mode. Listen to all voice groups on one timeslot. Even if you havent programmed the VG in a channel.
  • See last heard on the display on all VGs on the time slot you have assigned to the channel regardless if you have enabled that VG
  • VU meter for TX audio
  • Updated contact list database
  • Display dimming timer and intensity adjustable
  • Lower beep audio on transmit not allowed etc
  • List of last heard
  • Channel info on display: tx freq, rx freq, timeslot, TG, sender ID, repeater ID etc

Norwegian repeaterlist / Norsk repeaterliste (unofficial / uoffisiell)

Alf LA2NTA has made an excellent repeaterlist covering norwegian repeater that are updated quite frequently.

Alf edits the document straight at Google Drive. You can check out the most updated version on this link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tPHd2HDnkHOPJrQkDUpCRH00zhCIOoMiAMqaustzqsk/edit#gid=1

 

Tytera TYT-390 GPS setup

To set up GPS on the TYT-390, make an own contact with name GPS and call ID 5057

 

 

 

 

 

Then set up Destination ID: GPS under GPS settings. Set the interval to 60s or more. (Not too often as GPS packets take repeater capacity)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now select “GPS system 1” under the channels you want GPS enabled on. I have made a set of channels with GPS on and a set of channels with GPS off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Brandmeister dashboard, go to Services/Self Care and select chinese radio. Check that your call and your name looks OK (you need an account at Brandmeister).

 

 

 

Then program your radio with the codeplug with the radio settings above.

Set your radio outside for several minutes to achieve GPS lock (can take quite some time).

You should see a globe symbol show up without the red ring (red ring means no GPS lock).

Then you can check aprs.fi for your callsign.

Deep learning and artificial papers, courses and contact persons

A list of resources related to deep learning and artificial intelligence:

Free Online deep learning Books

  1. Deep Learning by Yoshua Bengio, Ian Goodfellow and Aaron Courville (05/07/2015)
  2. Neural Networks and Deep Learning by Michael Nielsen (Dec 2014)
  3. Deep Learning by Microsoft Research (2013)
  4. Deep Learning Tutorial by LISA lab, University of Montreal (Jan 6 2015)
  5. neuraltalk by Andrej Karpathy : numpy-based RNN/LSTM implementation
  6. An introduction to genetic algorithms
  7. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
  8. Deep Learning in Neural Networks: An Overview

Courses in machine learning

  1. Machine Learning – Stanford by Andrew Ng in Coursera (2010-2014)
  2. Machine Learning – Caltech by Yaser Abu-Mostafa (2012-2014)
  3. Machine Learning – Carnegie Mellon by Tom Mitchell (Spring 2011)
  4. Neural Networks for Machine Learning by Geoffrey Hinton in Coursera (2012)
  5. Neural networks class by Hugo Larochelle from Université de Sherbrooke (2013)
  6. Deep Learning Course by CILVR lab @ NYU (2014)
  7. A.I – Berkeley by Dan Klein and Pieter Abbeel (2013)
  8. A.I – MIT by Patrick Henry Winston (2010)
  9. Vision and learning – computers and brainsby Shimon Ullman, Tomaso Poggio, Ethan Meyers @ MIT (2013)
  10. Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition – Stanford by Fei-Fei Li, Andrej Karpathy (2015)
  11. Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition – Stanford by Fei-Fei Li, Andrej Karpathy (2016)
  12. Deep Learning for Natural Language Processing – Stanford
  13. Neural Networks – usherbrooke
  14. Machine Learning – Oxford (2014-2015)
  15. Deep Learning – Nvidia (2015)
  16. Graduate Summer School: Deep Learning, Feature Learning by Geoffrey Hinton, Yoshua Bengio, Yann LeCun, Andrew Ng, Nando de Freitas and several others @ IPAM, UCLA (2012)
  17. Deep Learning – Udacity/Google by Vincent Vanhoucke and Arpan Chakraborty (2016)
  18. Deep Learning – UWaterloo by Prof. Ali Ghodsi at University of Waterloo (2015)
  19. Statistical Machine Learning – CMU by Prof. Larry Wasserman
  20. Deep Learning Course by Yann LeCun (2016)
  21. Bay area DL school by Andrew Ng, Yoshua Bengio, Samy Bengio, Andrej Karpathy, Richard Socher, Hugo Larochelle and many others @ Stanford, CA (2016) 20.Designing, Visualizing and Understanding Deep Neural Networks-UC Berkeley
  22. UVA Deep Learning Course MSc in Artificial Intelligence for the University of Amsterdam.

Videos and Lectures in machine learning

  1. How To Create A Mind By Ray Kurzweil
  2. Deep Learning, Self-Taught Learning and Unsupervised Feature Learning By Andrew Ng
  3. Recent Developments in Deep Learning By Geoff Hinton
  4. The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Deep Learning by Yann LeCun
  5. Deep Learning of Representations by Yoshua bengio
  6. Principles of Hierarchical Temporal Memoryby Jeff Hawkins
  7. Machine Learning Discussion Group – Deep Learning w/ Stanford AI Lab by Adam Coates
  8. Making Sense of the World with Deep Learning By Adam Coates
  9. Demystifying Unsupervised Feature LearningBy Adam Coates
  10. Visual Perception with Deep Learning By Yann LeCun
  11. The Next Generation of Neural Networks By Geoffrey Hinton at GoogleTechTalks
  12. The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn By Jeremy Howard at TEDxBrussels
  13. Unsupervised Deep Learning – Stanford by Andrew Ng in Stanford (2011)
  14. Natural Language Processing By Chris Manning in Stanford
  15. A beginners Guide to Deep Neural NetworksBy Natalie Hammel and Lorraine Yurshansky
  16. Deep Learning: Intelligence from Big Data by Steve Jurvetson (and panel) at VLAB in Stanford.
  17. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks and Deep Learning by Leo Isikdogan at Motorola Mobility HQ

Papers

 

  1. ImageNet Classification with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks
  2. Using Very Deep Autoencoders for Content Based Image Retrieval
  3. Learning Deep Architectures for AI
  4. CMU’s list of papers
  5. Neural Networks for Named Entity Recognition zip
  6. Training tricks by YB
  7. Geoff Hinton’s reading list (all papers)
  8. Supervised Sequence Labelling with Recurrent Neural Networks
  9. Statistical Language Models based on Neural Networks
  10. Training Recurrent Neural Networks
  11. Recursive Deep Learning for Natural Language Processing and Computer Vision
  12. Bi-directional RNN
  13. LSTM
  14. GRU – Gated Recurrent Unit
  15. GFRNN . .
  16. LSTM: A Search Space Odyssey
  17. A Critical Review of Recurrent Neural Networks for Sequence Learning
  18. Visualizing and Understanding Recurrent Networks
  19. Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever, An Empirical Exploration of Recurrent Network Architectures
  20. Recurrent Neural Network based Language Model
  21. Extensions of Recurrent Neural Network Language Model
  22. Recurrent Neural Network based Language Modeling in Meeting Recognition
  23. Deep Neural Networks for Acoustic Modeling in Speech Recognition
  24. Speech Recognition with Deep Recurrent Neural Networks
  25. Reinforcement Learning Neural Turing Machines
  26. Learning Phrase Representations using RNN Encoder-Decoder for Statistical Machine Translation
  27. Google – Sequence to Sequence Learning with Nneural Networks
  28. Memory Networks
  29. Policy Learning with Continuous Memory States for Partially Observed Robotic Control
  30. Microsoft – Jointly Modeling Embedding and Translation to Bridge Video and Language
  31. Neural Turing Machines
  32. Ask Me Anything: Dynamic Memory Networks for Natural Language Processing
  33. Mastering the Game of Go with Deep Neural Networks and Tree Search
  34. Batch Normalization
  35. Residual Learning
  36. [Berkeley AI Research (BAIR) Laboratory] Image-to-Image Translation with Conditional Adversarial Networks (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1611.07004v1.pdf)

Tutorials

  1. UFLDL Tutorial 1
  2. UFLDL Tutorial 2
  3. Deep Learning for NLP (without Magic)
  4. A Deep Learning Tutorial: From Perceptrons to Deep Networks
  5. Deep Learning from the Bottom up
  6. Theano Tutorial
  7. Neural Networks for Matlab
  8. Using convolutional neural nets to detect facial keypoints tutorial
  9. Torch7 Tutorials
  10. The Best Machine Learning Tutorials On The Web
  11. VGG Convolutional Neural Networks Practical
  12. TensorFlow tutorials
  13. More TensorFlow tutorials
  14. TensorFlow Python Notebooks
  15. Keras and Lasagne Deep Learning Tutorials
  16. Classification on raw time series in TensorFlow with a LSTM RNN

Researchers

  1. Aaron Courville
  2. Abdel-rahman Mohamed
  3. Adam Coates
  4. Alex Acero
  5. Alex Krizhevsky
  6. Alexander Ilin
  7. Amos Storkey
  8. Andrej Karpathy
  9. Andrew M. Saxe
  10. Andrew Ng
  11. Andrew W. Senior
  12. Andriy Mnih
  13. Ayse Naz Erkan
  14. Benjamin Schrauwen
  15. Bernardete Ribeiro
  16. Bo David Chen
  17. Boureau Y-Lan
  18. Brian Kingsbury
  19. Christopher Manning
  20. Clement Farabet
  21. Dan Claudiu Cireșan
  22. David Reichert
  23. Derek Rose
  24. Dong Yu
  25. Drausin Wulsin
  26. Erik M. Schmidt
  27. Eugenio Culurciello
  28. Frank Seide
  29. Galen Andrew
  30. Geoffrey Hinton
  31. George Dahl
  32. Graham Taylor
  33. Grégoire Montavon
  34. Guido Francisco Montúfar
  35. Guillaume Desjardins
  36. Hannes Schulz
  37. Hélène Paugam-Moisy
  38. Honglak Lee
  39. Hugo Larochelle
  40. Ilya Sutskever
  41. Itamar Arel
  42. James Martens
  43. Jason Morton
  44. Jason Weston
  45. Jeff Dean
  46. Jiquan Mgiam
  47. Joseph Turian
  48. Joshua Matthew Susskind
  49. Jürgen Schmidhuber
  50. Justin A. Blanco
  51. Koray Kavukcuoglu
  52. KyungHyun Cho
  53. Li Deng
  54. Lucas Theis
  55. Ludovic Arnold
  56. Marc’Aurelio Ranzato
  57. Martin Längkvist
  58. Misha Denil
  59. Mohammad Norouzi
  60. Nando de Freitas
  61. Navdeep Jaitly
  62. Nicolas Le Roux
  63. Nitish Srivastava
  64. Noel Lopes
  65. Oriol Vinyals
  66. Pascal Vincent
  67. Patrick Nguyen
  68. Pedro Domingos
  69. Peggy Series
  70. Pierre Sermanet
  71. Piotr Mirowski
  72. Quoc V. Le
  73. Reinhold Scherer
  74. Richard Socher
  75. Rob Fergus
  76. Robert Coop
  77. Robert Gens
  78. Roger Grosse
  79. Ronan Collobert
  80. Ruslan Salakhutdinov
  81. Sebastian Gerwinn
  82. Stéphane Mallat
  83. Sven Behnke
  84. Tapani Raiko
  85. Tara Sainath
  86. Tijmen Tieleman
  87. Tom Karnowski
  88. Tomáš Mikolov
  89. Ueli Meier
  90. Vincent Vanhoucke
  91. Volodymyr Mnih
  92. Yann LeCun
  93. Yichuan Tang
  94. Yoshua Bengio
  95. Yotaro Kubo
  96. Youzhi (Will) Zou

WebSites

  1. deeplearning.net
  2. deeplearning.stanford.edu
  3. nlp.stanford.edu
  4. ai-junkie.com
  5. cs.brown.edu/research/ai
  6. eecs.umich.edu/ai
  7. cs.utexas.edu/users/ai-lab
  8. cs.washington.edu/research/ai
  9. aiai.ed.ac.uk
  10. www-aig.jpl.nasa.gov
  11. csail.mit.edu
  12. cgi.cse.unsw.edu.au/~aishare
  13. cs.rochester.edu/research/ai
  14. ai.sri.com
  15. isi.edu/AI/isd.htm
  16. nrl.navy.mil/itd/aic
  17. hips.seas.harvard.edu
  18. AI Weekly
  19. stat.ucla.edu
  20. deeplearning.cs.toronto.edu
  21. jeffdonahue.com/lrcn/
  22. visualqa.org
  23. www.mpi-inf.mpg.de/departments/computer-vision…
  24. Deep Learning News

Datasets

  1. MNIST Handwritten digits
  2. Google House Numbers from street view
  3. CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100
  4. IMAGENET
  5. Tiny Images 80 Million tiny images6.
  6. Flickr Data 100 Million Yahoo dataset
  7. Berkeley Segmentation Dataset 500
  8. UC Irvine Machine Learning Repository
  9. Flickr 8k
  10. Flickr 30k
  11. Microsoft COCO
  12. VQA
  13. Image QA
  14. AT&T Laboratories Cambridge face database
  15. AVHRR Pathfinder
  16. Air Freight – The Air Freight data set is a ray-traced image sequence along with ground truth segmentation based on textural characteristics. (455 images + GT, each 160×120 pixels). (Formats: PNG)
  17. Amsterdam Library of Object Images – ALOI is a color image collection of one-thousand small objects, recorded for scientific purposes. In order to capture the sensory variation in object recordings, we systematically varied viewing angle, illumination angle, and illumination color for each object, and additionally captured wide-baseline stereo images. We recorded over a hundred images of each object, yielding a total of 110,250 images for the collection. (Formats: png)
  18. Annotated face, hand, cardiac & meat images – Most images & annotations are supplemented by various ASM/AAM analyses using the AAM-API. (Formats: bmp,asf)
  19. Image Analysis and Computer Graphics
  20. Brown University Stimuli – A variety of datasets including geons, objects, and “greebles”. Good for testing recognition algorithms. (Formats: pict)
  21. CAVIAR video sequences of mall and public space behavior – 90K video frames in 90 sequences of various human activities, with XML ground truth of detection and behavior classification (Formats: MPEG2 & JPEG)
  22. Machine Vision Unit
  23. CCITT Fax standard images – 8 images (Formats: gif)
  24. CMU CIL’s Stereo Data with Ground Truth – 3 sets of 11 images, including color tiff images with spectroradiometry (Formats: gif, tiff)
  25. CMU PIE Database – A database of 41,368 face images of 68 people captured under 13 poses, 43 illuminations conditions, and with 4 different expressions.
  26. CMU VASC Image Database – Images, sequences, stereo pairs (thousands of images) (Formats: Sun Rasterimage)
  27. Caltech Image Database – about 20 images – mostly top-down views of small objects and toys. (Formats: GIF)
  28. Columbia-Utrecht Reflectance and Texture Database – Texture and reflectance measurements for over 60 samples of 3D texture, observed with over 200 different combinations of viewing and illumination directions. (Formats: bmp)
  29. Computational Colour Constancy Data – A dataset oriented towards computational color constancy, but useful for computer vision in general. It includes synthetic data, camera sensor data, and over 700 images. (Formats: tiff)
  30. Computational Vision Lab
  31. Content-based image retrieval database – 11 sets of color images for testing algorithms for content-based retrieval. Most sets have a description file with names of objects in each image. (Formats: jpg)
  32. Efficient Content-based Retrieval Group
  33. Densely Sampled View Spheres – Densely sampled view spheres – upper half of the view sphere of two toy objects with 2500 images each. (Formats: tiff)
  34. Computer Science VII (Graphical Systems)
  35. Digital Embryos – Digital embryos are novel objects which may be used to develop and test object recognition systems. They have an organic appearance. (Formats: various formats are available on request)
  36. Univerity of Minnesota Vision Lab
  37. El Salvador Atlas of Gastrointestinal VideoEndoscopy – Images and Videos of his-res of studies taken from Gastrointestinal Video endoscopy. (Formats: jpg, mpg, gif)
  38. FG-NET Facial Aging Database – Database contains 1002 face images showing subjects at different ages. (Formats: jpg)
  39. FVC2000 Fingerprint Databases – FVC2000 is the First International Competition for Fingerprint Verification Algorithms. Four fingerprint databases constitute the FVC2000 benchmark (3520 fingerprints in all).
  40. Biometric Systems Lab – University of Bologna
  41. Face and Gesture images and image sequences – Several image datasets of faces and gestures that are ground truth annotated for benchmarking
  42. German Fingerspelling Database – The database contains 35 gestures and consists of 1400 image sequences that contain gestures of 20 different persons recorded under non-uniform daylight lighting conditions. (Formats: mpg,jpg)
  43. Language Processing and Pattern Recognition
  44. Groningen Natural Image Database – 4000+ 1536×1024 (16 bit) calibrated outdoor images (Formats: homebrew)
  45. ICG Testhouse sequence – 2 turntable sequences from ifferent viewing heights, 36 images each, resolution 1000×750, color (Formats: PPM)
  46. Institute of Computer Graphics and Vision
  47. IEN Image Library – 1000+ images, mostly outdoor sequences (Formats: raw, ppm)
  48. INRIA’s Syntim images database – 15 color image of simple objects (Formats: gif)
  49. INRIA
  50. INRIA’s Syntim stereo databases – 34 calibrated color stereo pairs (Formats: gif)
  51. Image Analysis Laboratory – Images obtained from a variety of imaging modalities — raw CFA images, range images and a host of “medical images”. (Formats: homebrew)
  52. Image Analysis Laboratory
  53. Image Database – An image database including some textures
  54. JAFFE Facial Expression Image Database – The JAFFE database consists of 213 images of Japanese female subjects posing 6 basic facial expressions as well as a neutral pose. Ratings on emotion adjectives are also available, free of charge, for research purposes. (Formats: TIFF Grayscale images.)
  55. ATR Research, Kyoto, Japan
  56. JISCT Stereo Evaluation – 44 image pairs. These data have been used in an evaluation of stereo analysis, as described in the April 1993 ARPA Image Understanding Workshop paper “The JISCT Stereo Evaluation” by R.C.Bolles, H.H.Baker, and M.J.Hannah, 263–274 (Formats: SSI)
  57. MIT Vision Texture – Image archive (100+ images) (Formats: ppm)
  58. MIT face images and more – hundreds of images (Formats: homebrew)
  59. Machine Vision – Images from the textbook by Jain, Kasturi, Schunck (20+ images) (Formats: GIF TIFF)
  60. Mammography Image Databases – 100 or more images of mammograms with ground truth. Additional images available by request, and links to several other mammography databases are provided. (Formats: homebrew)
  61. ftp://ftp.cps.msu.edu/pub/prip – many images (Formats: unknown)
  62. Middlebury Stereo Data Sets with Ground Truth – Six multi-frame stereo data sets of scenes containing planar regions. Each data set contains 9 color images and subpixel-accuracy ground-truth data. (Formats: ppm)
  63. Middlebury Stereo Vision Research Page – Middlebury College
  64. Modis Airborne simulator, Gallery and data set – High Altitude Imagery from around the world for environmental modeling in support of NASA EOS program (Formats: JPG and HDF)
  65. NIST Fingerprint and handwriting – datasets – thousands of images (Formats: unknown)
  66. NIST Fingerprint data – compressed multipart uuencoded tar file
  67. NLM HyperDoc Visible Human Project – Color, CAT and MRI image samples – over 30 images (Formats: jpeg)
  68. National Design Repository – Over 55,000 3D CAD and solid models of (mostly) mechanical/machined engineerign designs. (Formats: gif,vrml,wrl,stp,sat)
  69. Geometric & Intelligent Computing Laboratory
  70. OSU (MSU) 3D Object Model Database – several sets of 3D object models collected over several years to use in object recognition research (Formats: homebrew, vrml)
  71. OSU (MSU/WSU) Range Image Database – Hundreds of real and synthetic images (Formats: gif, homebrew)
  72. OSU/SAMPL Database: Range Images, 3D Models, Stills, Motion Sequences – Over 1000 range images, 3D object models, still images and motion sequences (Formats: gif, ppm, vrml, homebrew)
  73. Signal Analysis and Machine Perception Laboratory
  74. Otago Optical Flow Evaluation Sequences – Synthetic and real sequences with machine-readable ground truth optical flow fields, plus tools to generate ground truth for new sequences. (Formats: ppm,tif,homebrew)
  75. Vision Research Group
  76. ftp://ftp.limsi.fr/pub/quenot/opflow/testdata/piv/ – Real and synthetic image sequences used for testing a Particle Image Velocimetry application. These images may be used for the test of optical flow and image matching algorithms. (Formats: pgm (raw))
  77. LIMSI-CNRS/CHM/IMM/vision
  78. LIMSI-CNRS
  79. Photometric 3D Surface Texture Database – This is the first 3D texture database which provides both full real surface rotations and registered photometric stereo data (30 textures, 1680 images). (Formats: TIFF)
  80. SEQUENCES FOR OPTICAL FLOW ANALYSIS (SOFA) – 9 synthetic sequences designed for testing motion analysis applications, including full ground truth of motion and camera parameters. (Formats: gif)
  81. Computer Vision Group
  82. Sequences for Flow Based Reconstruction – synthetic sequence for testing structure from motion algorithms (Formats: pgm)
  83. Stereo Images with Ground Truth Disparity and Occlusion – a small set of synthetic images of a hallway with varying amounts of noise added. Use these images to benchmark your stereo algorithm. (Formats: raw, viff (khoros), or tiff)
  84. Stuttgart Range Image Database – A collection of synthetic range images taken from high-resolution polygonal models available on the web (Formats: homebrew)
  85. Department Image Understanding
  86. The AR Face Database – Contains over 4,000 color images corresponding to 126 people’s faces (70 men and 56 women). Frontal views with variations in facial expressions, illumination, and occlusions. (Formats: RAW (RGB 24-bit))
  87. Purdue Robot Vision Lab
  88. The MIT-CSAIL Database of Objects and Scenes – Database for testing multiclass object detection and scene recognition algorithms. Over 72,000 images with 2873 annotated frames. More than 50 annotated object classes. (Formats: jpg)
  89. The RVL SPEC-DB (SPECularity DataBase) – A collection of over 300 real images of 100 objects taken under three different illuminaiton conditions (Diffuse/Ambient/Directed). — Use these images to test algorithms for detecting and compensating specular highlights in color images. (Formats: TIFF )
  90. Robot Vision Laboratory
  91. The Xm2vts database – The XM2VTSDB contains four digital recordings of 295 people taken over a period of four months. This database contains both image and video data of faces.
  92. Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing
  93. Traffic Image Sequences and ‘Marbled Block’ Sequence – thousands of frames of digitized traffic image sequences as well as the ‘Marbled Block’ sequence (grayscale images) (Formats: GIF)
  94. IAKS/KOGS
  95. U Bern Face images – hundreds of images (Formats: Sun rasterfile)
  96. U Michigan textures (Formats: compressed raw)
  97. U Oulu wood and knots database – Includes classifications – 1000+ color images (Formats: ppm)
  98. UCID – an Uncompressed Colour Image Database – a benchmark database for image retrieval with predefined ground truth. (Formats: tiff)
  99. UMass Vision Image Archive – Large image database with aerial, space, stereo, medical images and more. (Formats: homebrew)
  100. UNC’s 3D image database – many images (Formats: GIF)
  101. USF Range Image Data with Segmentation Ground Truth – 80 image sets (Formats: Sun rasterimage)
  102. University of Oulu Physics-based Face Database – contains color images of faces under different illuminants and camera calibration conditions as well as skin spectral reflectance measurements of each person.
  103. Machine Vision and Media Processing Unit
  104. University of Oulu Texture Database – Database of 320 surface textures, each captured under three illuminants, six spatial resolutions and nine rotation angles. A set of test suites is also provided so that texture segmentation, classification, and retrieval algorithms can be tested in a standard manner. (Formats: bmp, ras, xv)
  105. Machine Vision Group
  106. Usenix face database – Thousands of face images from many different sites (circa 994)
  107. View Sphere Database – Images of 8 objects seen from many different view points. The view sphere is sampled using a geodesic with 172 images/sphere. Two sets for training and testing are available. (Formats: ppm)
  108. PRIMA, GRAVIR
  109. Vision-list Imagery Archive – Many images, many formats
  110. Wiry Object Recognition Database – Thousands of images of a cart, ladder, stool, bicycle, chairs, and cluttered scenes with ground truth labelings of edges and regions. (Formats: jpg)
  111. 3D Vision Group
  112. Yale Face Database – 165 images (15 individuals) with different lighting, expression, and occlusion configurations.
  113. Yale Face Database B – 5760 single light source images of 10 subjects each seen under 576 viewing conditions (9 poses x 64 illumination conditions). (Formats: PGM)
  114. Center for Computational Vision and Control
  115. DeepMind QA Corpus – Textual QA corpus from CNN and DailyMail. More than 300K documents in total. Paper for reference.
  116. YouTube-8M Dataset – YouTube-8M is a large-scale labeled video dataset that consists of 8 million YouTube video IDs and associated labels from a diverse vocabulary of 4800 visual entities.
  117. Open Images dataset – Open Images is a dataset of ~9 million URLs to images that have been annotated with labels spanning over 6000 categories.

Frameworks

  1. Caffe
  2. Torch7
  3. Theano
  4. cuda-convnet
  5. convetjs
  6. Ccv
  7. NuPIC
  8. DeepLearning4J
  9. Brain
  10. DeepLearnToolbox
  11. Deepnet
  12. Deeppy
  13. JavaNN
  14. hebel
  15. Mocha.jl
  16. OpenDL
  17. cuDNN
  18. MGL
  19. Knet.jl
  20. Nvidia DIGITS – a web app based on Caffe
  21. Neon – Python based Deep Learning Framework
  22. Keras – Theano based Deep Learning Library
  23. Chainer – A flexible framework of neural networks for deep learning
  24. RNNLM Toolkit
  25. RNNLIB – A recurrent neural network library
  26. char-rnn
  27. MatConvNet: CNNs for MATLAB
  28. Minerva – a fast and flexible tool for deep learning on multi-GPU
  29. Brainstorm – Fast, flexible and fun neural networks.
  30. Tensorflow – Open source software library for numerical computation using data flow graphs
  31. DMTK – Microsoft Distributed Machine Learning Tookit
  32. Scikit Flow – Simplified interface for TensorFlow (mimicking Scikit Learn)
  33. MXnet – Lightweight, Portable, Flexible Distributed/Mobile Deep Learning framework
  34. Veles – Samsung Distributed machine learning platform
  35. Marvin – A Minimalist GPU-only N-Dimensional ConvNets Framework
  36. Apache SINGA – A General Distributed Deep Learning Platform
  37. DSSTNE – Amazon’s library for building Deep Learning models
  38. SyntaxNet – Google’s syntactic parser – A TensorFlow dependency library
  39. mlpack – A scalable Machine Learning library
  40. Torchnet – Torch based Deep Learning Library
  41. Paddle – PArallel Distributed Deep LEarning by Baidu
  42. NeuPy – Theano based Python library for ANN and Deep Learning

Miscellaneous

  1. Google Plus – Deep Learning Community
  2. Caffe Webinar
  3. 100 Best Github Resources in Github for DL
  4. Word2Vec
  5. Caffe DockerFile
  6. TorontoDeepLEarning convnet
  7. gfx.js
  8. Torch7 Cheat sheet
  9. Misc from MIT’s ‘Advanced Natural Language Processing’ course
  10. Misc from MIT’s ‘Machine Learning’ course
  11. Misc from MIT’s ‘Networks for Learning: Regression and Classification’ course
  12. Misc from MIT’s ‘Neural Coding and Perception of Sound’ course
  13. Implementing a Distributed Deep Learning Network over Spark
  14. A chess AI that learns to play chess using deep learning.
  15. Reproducing the results of “Playing Atari with Deep Reinforcement Learning” by DeepMind
  16. Wiki2Vec. Getting Word2vec vectors for entities and word from Wikipedia Dumps
  17. The original code from the DeepMind article + tweaks
  18. Google deepdream – Neural Network art
  19. An efficient, batched LSTM.
  20. A recurrent neural network designed to generate classical music.
  21. Memory Networks Implementations – Facebook
  22. Face recognition with Google’s FaceNet deep neural network.
  23. Basic digit recognition neural network
  24. Emotion Recognition API Demo – Microsoft
  25. Proof of concept for loading Caffe models in TensorFlow
  26. YOLO: Real-Time Object Detection
  27. AlphaGo – A replication of DeepMind’s 2016 Nature publication, “Mastering the game of Go with deep neural networks and tree search”
  28. Machine Learning for Software Engineers
  29. Machine L

CAT / RS232 / CW interface (FTDI, MAX232, 5V controllable FETs)

I made a CAT and CW interface from readily available components. Of course it is possible to buy a microham interface or simular. However, I wanted no USB soundcard functionality and Xp, Win 10, Linux compatibility without having to install drivers. A native FTDI chip from SF will do the job nicely. The FTDI chip has 5V TTL out and the true RS232 has +-1 12V signal levels. Therefore I pressed a MAX232 board that I designed approx 10 years ago and was laying in the junkobox into service. 5V TTL into and out from the MAX232 chip into the FTDI chip.
I used some “5V TTL FETs” for switching the CW signal. The RTS / CTS signals from the FTDI interface can drive these fets directly. I needed to invert the signal so that the CW keying is off by default. So since I had two of the 5V TTL FETs laying in the junkbox, I used one to invert and one to drive the CW key output. On the picture to the left the fets can be seen.
Here the quick and dirty prototype can be seen. The old RS232 converter board to the left, the switching FETs to the right and the FTDI board below.

New front end for use of the Red Pitaya in SDR applications

The Red Pitaya SDR board is based on the Xilinx Zync SOC and has 14 bit external A/D converters. However, for SDR usage on the HF bands from 0.1-30 MHz (and for that matter up to 50 MHz) the Red Pitaya is a bit “deaf” in the stock configuration. I have made a broadband amplifier that has a fairly high gain and very good IIP3 properties. Below I have posed some pictures of the prototype amplifier.

20160424_153046-1This is the prototype amplifier. I inserted a ferrite ring on the input lead to roll off the VHF / UHF sensitivity to reduce problems with nearby broadcasters etc. There is a also a PI network attenuator on the ouput and I have inserted a couple of beads in that as well to roll of the outpu response when frequency increases. The other components in the lower part is a input pi attenuator I used when I did some VNA frequency response measurements. This as well as the RCA plus is not used (RCA plugs are surprisingly good for low level RF signal routing in the HF bands and nice to use in the lab).  I used a more professional attenuator with a large attenuation range and flat response to determine the proper attenuation level after the preamp into the Red Pitaya. Reducing gain after the first amplifier has very little effect on the noise figure. Reducing it before the first amplifier directly adds to the noise figure. I added some protection diodes over the input to reduce the risk of strong RF signals or static voltage build up damaging the input. Below I am measuring the response of the attenuator with the DG8SAQ VNA. It was flat from 0-1,3 GHz.

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Red Pitaya SDR TX / RX

The Red Pitaya hardware is the first low cost RX / TX capable SDR hw to come onto the market that is open source and can match the Ettus Research USRP periperhal. It has a combined CPU and FPGA signal chain with  two channels 14 bit 125 MSPS A/D and D/A. It also has a Dual core ARM Cortex A9+ FPGA (Xilinx Zynq 7010 system on chip). Only a few years ago this caliber of hardware had to be custom designed and was typically used in radar antijamming systems, radar signature classification systems, ultrasound, sonar and in high end vibration analysis tools (as examples). The ARM CPU on board can run Linux and it has GNU-Radio support. For fast data transfer there is a GBE (Gibabit Ethernet) interface to other host systems. With a a RTOS on the ARM core or a zero copy IP stack under Linux it should be possible to approach fairly close to 1 Gbit/sek transfer rates to host systems (if needed).
References:
http://www.rs-online.com/designspark/electronics/eng/nodes/view/type:design-centre/slug:red-pitaya
http://wiki.redpitaya.com/index.php?title=Hardware_Overview

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Teardown of the AnyTone AT-5189 4m FM radio

I purchased a couple of Anytone AT-5189 4m FM radios at a flea market. As the radio is of Chinese origin I was interested in seeing how the chinese engineers is coming along regarding design, waterproofing / IP degree, PCB layout, internal shielding, component selection and general workmanship.

Summary: the radio is surprisingly well designed. A cast alu chassis is made with milled grooves for O rings, professional layed out PCB,  proper ground vias and compartmentization,  no stray cabling inside. The integrated chips used in the design are LMX1511 synthesizer, MC3311 compander, M62364 DA, KIA278 LDO, RDO7MVS18 driver. Well known integrated circuits.

Some pictures:

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HDSDR trackerball VFO project

I have been working on a trackball based controller for my HDSDR SDR project lately. This is a small R&D project that is run on my spare time where the goal is to determine if it is possible to use a trackball as a VFO for software defined radio (SDR) in contests. The project started out based on a demand for a more ergonomic way to operate a mult receiver in a contest environment that is less fatiguing during 48hours duration of a major contest like CQWW or CQWPX. The goal is that it should be possible to operate all radio functions you need from one hand only: VFO, speed of vfo, band, mode, filter width, volume, gain. I have modified a Marconi trackball and the controller is a Trinket Pro controller (Arduino)

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